Comparison of dance techniques

Difference between Argentine, Uruguayan and Ballroom tango

Argentine, Uruguayan, and Ballroom Tango use very different techniques. In Argentine and Uruguayan tango, the body’s center moves first, then the feet reach to support it. In ballroom tango, the body is initially set in motion across the floor through the flexing of the lower joints (hip, knee, ankle) while the feet are delayed, then the feet move quickly to catch the body, resulting in snatching or striking action that reflects the staccato nature of this style’s preferred music.

In tango, the steps are typically more gliding, but can vary widely in timing, speed, and character, and follow no single specific rhythm. Because the dance is led and followed at the level of individual steps, these variations can occur from one step to the next. This allows the dancers to vary the dance from moment to moment to match the music (which often has both legato and/or staccato elements) and their mood.

The Tango’s frame, called an abrazo or “embrace,” is not rigid, but flexibly adjusts to different steps, and may vary from being quite close, to offset in a “V” frame, to open. The flexibility is as important as is all movement in dance. The American Ballroom Tango’s frame is flexible too, but experienced dancers frequently dance in closed position: higher in the elbows, tone in the arms and constant connection through the body. When dancing socially with a beginners, however, it may be better to use a more open position because the close position is too intimate for them. In American Tango open position may result in open breaks, pivots, and turns which are quite foreign in Argentine tango and International (English) tango.

There is a closed position as in other types of ballroom dance, but it differs significantly between types of tango. In Tango from the Rio de la Plata region, the “close embrace” involves continuous contact at the full upper body, but not the legs. In American Ballroom tango, the “close embrace” involves close contact in the pelvis or upper thighs, but not the upper body. Followers are instructed to thrust their hips forward, but pull their upper body away, and shyly look over their left shoulder when they are led into a “corte.”

In tango from the Rio de la Plata region, the open position, the legs may be intertwined and hooked together, in the style of Pulpo (the Octopus). In Pulpo’s style, these hooks are not sharp, but smooth ganchos.

In Tango from the Rio de la Plata, Uruguay and Argentina, the ball or toe of the foot may be placed first. Alternatively, the dancer may take the floor with the entire foot in a cat-like manner. In the International style of Tango, “heel leads” (stepping first onto the heel, then the whole foot) are used for forward steps.

Ballroom tango steps stay close to the floor, while the Rio de la Plata Tango (Uruguayan and Argentine) includes moves such as the boleo (allowing momentum to carry one’s leg into the air) and gancho (hooking one’s leg around one’s partner’s leg or body) in which the feet travel off the ground. Both Uruguayan and Argentine tango features other vocabulary foreign to ballroom, such as the parada (in which the leader puts his foot against the follower’s foot), the arrastre (in which the leader appears to drag or be dragged by the follower’s foot), and several kinds of sacada (in which the leader displaces the follower’s leg by stepping into her space). (Source = Wikipedia)